Announcements

Seminar In Medicine,16.10.2018, Doç. Dr. Turan Kanmaz

Author: KUSOM
Time: 14:00
Location: MED 176

KOÇ UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

 
SEMINAR IN MEDICINE
Tuesday, October 16th,
 2018

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Speaker         : Doç. Dr. Turan Kanmaz, Koç University Hospital, Department of 
Associate Professor of Pediatric Surgery

Title               : Liver Transplantation: Past, Present and Future

Time              : 14.00 (Refreshments will be served at 13:45)

Place              : MED 176

TelePresence   : AH 5th floor Chief Medical Officer / KUH 9th floor Meeting Room

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LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

With the improvements in perioperative management and immunosuppressants, liver transplantation has become the standard treatment for patients with end-stage liver diseases. The shortage of deceased donor liver grafts is still the universal problem in all transplant centers.

This seminar focuses on both the history and future of liver transplantation, and also our liver transplant experience. Here, we present the outcomes of 1043 consecutive adult and pediatric liver transplant patients. We also present the data of four new patients  liver transplanted at the Koç University Hospital.

82% of the cases were living-donor liver transplants. Almost one third of our patients were in the pediatric population. The main indication for liver transplant was hepatitis. The main complication after surgery was infection (30%). Postoperative technical complications include hepatic arterial thrombosis (1%), portal venous thrombosis (3%), and biliary problems (10%). One-, 3-, and 5-year patient survivals were 85%, 81%, and 77%. There was no serious postoperative complication in the living donors.

Technical expertise, donor selection and graft allocation are the main determinants of success. Living-donor liver transplant is a safe alternative to deceased-donor transplant and becoming the most frequent treatment option for end-stage liver disease.