Announcements

Seminar In Medicine, 16.04.2019, Dr. Mehmet Gökhan Gönenli

Author: KUSOM
Time: 14:00
Location: MED 176

KOÇ UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

 
SEMINAR IN MEDICINE
Tuesday, April 16th,
 2019

 ******************************************************************
Speaker        : Dr. Mehmet Gökhan Gönenli, Koç University Hospital, Department of 
Internal Medicine

Title              : The Role of Simulation-Based Training in Medical Education

Time             : 14.00 (Refreshments will be served at 13:45)

Place             : MED 176

TelePresence  : AH 5th floor Chief Medical Officer / KUH 9th floor Meeting Room

 ******************************************************************

THE ROLE OF SIMULATION-BASED TRAINING IN MEDICAL EDUCATION 

 The Institute of Medicine publication, “To Err is Human: Building a safer Health System,” released November 1, 1999, highlighting the prevalance of medical errors in the health care system, brought patient safety to the forefront of the medical and lay consciousness and generated action to define and implement new methods to systematically design safety into all processes of care. Preventable medical errors are the third cause of death in the United States. The roots of such alarming statistics may be found in medical education and innoviate educational approaches are necessary.

 Simulation based medical education can be a valuable tool for the safe delivery of health care. Simulation has unique features, since it provides a safe and controlled environment to teach a wide variety of not only technical abilities but also non-technical skills as well, and it is also reliable educational assessment method. Therefore, providing appropriate simulation for medical training is a major path compliant with best educational standarts and ethical principles in the process of medical education.

 Simulation based education creates opportunities for delibrate practice of new skills without involving real patients. Simulation takes many forms, from simple skills training models to computerised full-body mannequins, so that the needs of learners at each stage of their education can be targeted.

 Emerging evidence supports the value of simulation as an educational technique; to be effective it needs to be integrated into the curriculum in a way that promotes transfer of the skills learnt to clinical practice.