Announcements

ECONOMICS SEMINAR- Elif Demiral

Author: CASE
Time: 16:00
Location: CASE 127

KOÇ UNIVERSITY
FACULTY OF ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES AND ECONOMICS
ECONOMICS SEMINAR

27 February  2020 –THURSDAY

CASE 127 -16:00

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Speaker  : Elif E. Demiral- George Mason University

Title       : Competitiveness and Employability

Time       : 16:00-17:30

Place      : CASE 127

Date       : 27 February 2020 -THURSDAY

Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of signaling competitiveness on employability. We define three types of job candidates regarding competitive preferences: self-competitive, other- competitive, and non-competitive. Using one laboratory and two online experiments with a total of over 2000 participants, we investigate whether a candidate’s competitive taste affects (perceptions about) their likelihood of being hired for a job. First, our findings from the lab experiment show that self-competitive candidates are most likely to be hired in an experimental hiring market. Second, in our first online study, to increase the likelihood of being hired, hypothetical candidates are overwhelmingly recommended to mention that they are self-competitive in a cover letter. Third, in our second online study, candidates who express their taste for self-competition in their cover letters are regarded as more employable and more socially likable when compared to the other two types. Lastly, while other-competitive candidates are rated the least favorably in the social domains (i.e., receive a backlash), self-competitive candidates are believed to be the highest performers among all of the three types. Additionally, self-competitive candidates receive no negative feedback for being competitive, suggesting self-competitiveness potentially being an advantageous channel to signal productivity. All of our findings hold true for both male and female candidates.